Compromis: Case Concerning the Sisters of the Sun (Federation of the Clans of the Atan v. Kingdom of Rahad)

Topics: Transboundary aquifers, obligations to world heritage sites in danger, repatriation of cultural property, and cost of refugee crises

Location: Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.

Dates: 9-15 April 2017

Jessup World Cup Champion: University of Sydney (Australia)
Team Members - Alyssa Glass, Will Khun, Joel Phillips, Harry Stratton, and Eric Shi 
Coaches - Angus Nicholas, Alison Pert
 

Runner Up: Norman Manley Law School (Jamaica)
Team Members - Kalisia Miller, Jhade Lindsay, Victor Brown, Scott Mullings, and Anna-Kay Brown
Coaches - Marc Ramsay and Nancy Anderson

Championship Round Judges

H.E. James Crawford – Judge, International Court of Justice
H.E. Patrick Robinson – Judge, International Court of Justice
H.E. Bruno Simma – Former Judge, International Court of Justice
 

Problem Author: Jeffrey Brooks

Executive Director: Lesley A. Benn

Best Oralist (Championship Round): Alyssa Glass, University of Sydney (Australia)

Best Oralist (Preliminary Rounds): Andrew Grant, New Zealand (Auckland University)

Richard R. Baxter Award for Best Applicant Memorial: University of the Philippines - view

Richard R. Baxter Award for Best Respondent Memorial: University of Queensland - view

Alona E. Evans Award for Best Memorial at International Rounds: University of Queensland (Australia)

Hardy C. Dillard Awards for Best Combined Memorials - World & Qualifying Rounds

1.  Slovenia (University of Ljubljana)
2. Jamaica (Norman Manley Law School)
3. Germany (Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München)
4. Singapore (Singapore Management University)
5. (TIE)  U.S. (Yale University) and Philippines (University of the Philippines)
 
International Law Institute Award: Domen Turšič, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)
 

Best New Team: Eastern University (Bangladesh), University of Dhaka (Bangladesh)

Best Overall Applicant Side: Auckland University (New Zealand)

Best Overall Respondent Side: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (Chile)

Best Applicant Memorials at International Rounds: 1. Norman Manley Law School (Jamaica), 2. (Tie) Auckland University (New Zealand), Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Germany)

Best Respondent Memorials at International Rounds:1 University of Queensland (Australia), 2. (Tie) Kings College, London (United Kingdom), Koc University (Turkey)

Best Exhibition Team: Belarusian State University Faculty of International Relations (Belarus)

Best Exhibition Oralist: Darya Bohdan, Belarusian State University Faculty of International Relations (Belarus)

Best Exhibition Memorial: Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia)

Spirit of the Jessup Award: Allameh Tabatabaei University (Iran)

Steven M. Schneebaum Award: Nuran Choudhury (Bangladesh); Agnese Pizzolla (Italy); Daniyal Hassan and Don J. Calvert (Pakistan); Mohammed Fahim Samadi and Sayed Ramiz Hussaini (Afghanistan)

Pamela Young Award: Maria Issaeva 

2017 Results: 


2017 US Regional Results


2017 Competition Materials


First Batch of Basic Materials

Below is the first batch of Basic Materials provided in connection with the 2017 Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

 

The ILSA Executive Office, along with those involved in the writing and editing of the 2017 Jessup Compromis, have selected these materials and hope that you find them interesting in light of the context of this year's Compromis. 

 

We would like to emphasize that the simple inclusion of any particular text in the Basic Materials does not necessarily entail that the content of the text is binding as international law nor does it necessarily reflect current prevailing theory or practice.

 

Please note that teams are NOT required to use these materials. They are being provided to teams as a launching point for research. As always, participants are HIGHLY encouraged to conduct their own research outside of the scope of these Basic Materials.

 

  1. UN Charter
  2. ICJ Statute
  3. Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties
  4. Articles of Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts
  5. 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees
  6. 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees
  7. 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property
  8. 1972 World Heritage Convention
  9. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
  10. International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights
  11. UN General Assembly Resolution 63/124 (Draft Articles of Transboundary Aquifers)
  12. UN Guiding Principles of Unilateral Declarations
  13. ICESCR General Comment 12 (The Right to Adequate Food)
  14. ICESCR General Comment 15 (The Right to Water)
  15. Case Concerning the Gabčikovo-Nagymaros Project (Hungary v. Slovakia)
  16. Case Concerning the Pulp Mills on the River Uruguay (Argentina v. Uruguay)
  17. Nuclear Tests Case (New Zealand v. France)
  18. Case Concerning the Temple of Preah Vihear (Cambodia v. Thailand)
  19. Case Concerning the Factory at Chorzów (PCIJ)
  20. Beyeler v. Italy, App. No. 33202/96, ECHR 2000-I 57, (2001) 33 EHRR 52, IHRL 3137 (ECHR 2000)
  21. Katie Sykes, Hunger Without Frontiers: The Right to Food and State Obligations to Migrants, in The International Law of Disaster Relief (David Caron, Michael Kelly, & Anastasia Telestesky, eds., 2014)
  22. Marlies Hessleman, Sharing International Responsibility for Poor Migrants: An Analysis of Extra-Territorial Socio-Economic Human Rights Law, 15 Eur. J. Soc. Sec. 187 (2013)
  23. Carol Roehrenbeck, Repatriation of Cultural Property: Who Owns the Past? An Introduction to Approaches and to Selected Statutory Instruments, International Journal of Legal Information: Vol. 38: Iss. 2, Article 11 (2010)
  24. Gabriel Eckstein & Yoram Eckstein, A Hydrogeological Approach to Transboundary Ground Water Resources and International Law, 19 Amer. Univ. Int’l. L. Rev. 201 (2003)
  25. Kanchana Wangkeo, Monumental Challenges: The Lawfulness of Destroying Cultural Heritage During Peacetime, 28 Yale J. Int’l L. 183 (2003)

**Disclaimer:  The documents provided herein are for educational purposes only for the 2017 Jessup Competition.

Second Batch of Basic Materials

Below is the second batch of Basic Materials provided in connection with the 2017 Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

The ILSA Executive Office and those involved in the drafting of the 2017 Jessup Compromis have selected these materials.

The inclusion of a text in the Basic Materials does not necessarily entail that the content of the text is binding as international law nor does it necessarily reflect current prevailing theory or practice.

Please note that teams are NOT required to use these materials. They are provided to teams as a launching point for research. As always, participants are STRONGLY encouraged to conduct their own research outside of the scope of these Basic Materials.

Cases

1. Ahmadou Sadio Diallo (Guinea v. Dem. Rep. Congo), Judgment, 2010 I.C.J. Rep. 639.

2.  Legal Status of Eastern Greenland (Denmark v. Norway), 1993 P.C.I.J. (ser A/B) No. 53.

3. Questions Relating to the Obligation to Prosecute or Extradite (Belgium v. Senegal), Judgment, 2012 I.C.J. Rep. 422.

4. Sufi and Elmi v. United Kingdom, App. Nos. 8319/07 and 11449/07, [2011] ECHR 1045 (2012)

5. Trail Smelter Arbitration (United States v. Canada), 3 U.N. Rep. Int'l Arb. Awards 1905 (1941).

 

Articles

1. Joseph Blocher & Mitu Gulati, Competing for Refugees: A Market-Based Solution to a Humanitarian Crisis, 48 Columbia H.R. L. Rev. 2 (2016)

2. Joseph Fishman, Locating the International Interest in Intranational Cultural Property Disputes, 35 Yale J. Int'l L. 347

3. Francesco Francioni and Federico Lenzerini, The Destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan and International Law, 14 Eur. J. Int’l. L. 619 (2003).

4. Hannah Garry, The Right to Compensation and Refugee Flows: A Preventative Mechanism in International Law, 10 Int'l J. Refugee L. 97 (1998)

5. Luke Lee, The Declaration of Principles of International Law on Compensation to Refugees: Its Significance and Implications, 6 Journal of Refugee Studies 65 (1993) 

6. Lucas Lixinski, Selecting Heritage: The Interplay of Art, Politics and Identity, 22(1) Eur. J. Int’l L. 81 (2011).

7. Renee Martin-Nagle, Fossil Aquifers: A Common Heritage of Mankind, 2 Geo. Wash. J. Energy & Envtl. L. 39 (2011)

 

Other Sources

1. Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations of States in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

2. Theo van Boven, Study Concerning the Right to Restitution, Compensation and Rehabilitation for Victims of Gross Violations of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, U.N. Doc. EICN/41 Sub.2/1990/10.

3. Transboundary Aquifers: Managing a Vital Resource, Doc. No. SC-2008/WS/35 (UNESCO 2009).

 

*Disclaimer:  The documents provided herein are for educational purposes only for the 2017 Jessup Competition.